Temporel.fr

Accueil > à propos > Le rythme de la marche > Robert Graves, par Dunstan Ward

Robert Graves, par Dunstan Ward

9 mars 2007

par Dunstan Ward

“Why are we marching ?”

“Night March” by Robert Graves

JPEG - 29.8 ko
Photographies Guy Braun

On hearing Robert Graves read ‘Night March’ in December 1917, his friend and fellow-poet Siegfried Sassoon described it as ‘a wonderful thing’ – his most sustained effort’ (letter to Edward Marsh, 22 Dec. 1917). The poem movingly expresses the love that Graves felt for the Royal Welch Fusiliers. When he volunteered at the age of 19, a week after Britain declared war, he ‘quite blindly’ chose this regiment (Goodbye to All That, p. 72), but he ‘learned to worship’ it (letter to Marsh, 9 Feb. 1916).
‘Night March’ was newly-written when Sassoon went to Rhyl, North Wales, on 21 December 1917 to visit Graves, who was training young officers there. Graves had been home from France for the last ten months. Seriously wounded in the Battle of the Somme on 20 July 1916, he was reported to have died the next morning ; his name even appeared in the list of war dead in The Times. Yet he astonishingly survived, and six months later, having convalesced in Britain, he was back on the Somme. In the ice and mud of the trenches his health soon collapsed, and he finished up in hospital in Oxford. His active service was now over.
In the summer of 1918 Graves assembled a new collection, to be called ‘The Patchwork Flag’, and one of its forty-three poems was ‘Night March’. Sassoon, to whom he sent the typescript, renewed his praise of ‘Night March’, calling it ‘a fine thing’, though he added that he was ‘no good at criticizing long poems (being all for condensation and dagger-stabs)’ (sheet with ‘Patchwork Flag’ typescript, Berg). He was doubtful about the book as a whole, however, as was their mutual friend Robert Ross, and Graves decided to scrap it. Most of the poems subsequently appeared in periodicals and books, but ‘Night March’ remained unpublished. The typescript of ‘The Patchwork Flag’ lay forgotten in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library for over seventy years, until the critic and biographer Dominic Hibberd brought it to light. He printed the text of ‘Night March’ with an article in the Review of English Studies in 1990, calling ‘the stern salute to regimental courage’ one of Graves’s ‘most impressive statements about his war experience’ (p. 527). In 1999 the poem finally found its place with the rest of Graves’s poetry, in Volume III of his Complete Poems.
For ‘Night March’ Graves uses a traditional ballad form, ingeniously exploiting its technical features. The twenty-three quatrains correspond, as Dominic Hibberd has pointed out, both to the twenty-three miles of the march and to the regiment itself (the ‘Twenty-third of Foot’). The feat of completing the march is thus reflected in the ‘sustained effort’ of composition (and reading). The four-line stanza matches the formation of the soldiers, living and dead alike, who ‘march / In fours’ (st. 10 ll. 1–2), while the alternating a b a b rhyme scheme counterpoints the ‘left right left right’ of marching feet. This fourfold march-time pattern is felt most clearly in the four-stress rhythm of the lines, which Graves deploys with remarkable skill in order to heighten the sense, constantly varying the iambic metre (‘And shoulders laugh beneath their load’) with, in particular, trochees (notably at the start of a line, as in the first, ‘Evening :’) and spondees (‘Fall in !’). These rhythms are reinforced by related sound-patterns of alliteration and assonance, the life-long mastery of which Graves owed to his precocious study of traditional Welsh verse. The cumulative effect, stanza after stanza, is trance-like ; and ‘slumbrous trance’ (st.7 l. 2) aptly suggests the inspired state that Graves believed rhythm induced in the poet, and which the poem in turn recreated in the reader : ‘’The nucleus of every poem worthy of the name is rhythmically formed in the poet’s mind, during a trance-like suspension of his normal habits of thought, by the supra-logical reconciliation of conflicting emotional ideas’ ; ’the reader of the poem must fall into a complementary trance if he is to appreciate its full meaning’ (‘Observations on Poetry 1922–1925’, Collected Writings on Poetry, pp. 3–4).
A broader rhythm in ‘Night March’ is that of the six groups of stanzas, corresponding to the different stages of the march, into which the poem divides. There is a tranquil introduction as ‘we soldiers’ share the evening respite, cut short by the ‘ringing call’ to fall in. One draft of the poem (in the Poetry Collection, SUNY at Buffalo) has verbal exchanges between ‘An Officer’ (‘the Captain’ – ‘A fine night to be travelling, men !’), ‘Corporal’ and ‘Lance-Corporal’. The theme of comradeship, and the poem’s dramatic impact, are strengthened in the final version by depicting the march from the point of view of ‘the men’. (The first-person narrator who curses his ‘burdening pack’ in stanza 11 is one of them, for officers (like Captain Graves) did not carry packs and rifles : see the extract from Goodbye to All That, below.)
The marchers set off in high spirits, but in the fourth stanza there are sombre undertones. ‘Where are we marching ? No one knows, / Why are we marching ? No one cares’ : the seeming insouciance has, on another level, implications of futility, helplessness, irresponsibility. Are they ‘going West’ in more than one sense ? The sunset ‘flares’, as if to illuminate a target …
These hints are confirmed in the next part (stanzas 5–7), as the soldiers march down a wet road through trees. Dusk transforms sounds and shapes into sinister omens ; in their state of ‘slumbrous trance’ the soldiers are ambushed by the irrational forces of the unconscious that find expression in myth and fairy tale and folk belief. The ‘Old demons of the night’ are akin to the ‘Old gods’ of ‘Outlaws’, another poem in ‘The Patchwork Flag’, that ‘lurk in the wet woods’, ‘Greedy of human stuff’. The wailing of a banshee (a pre-Christian Gaelic supernatural being) was believed to presage death. The soldiers realise they are marching ‘Down to the Somme’ – they are already doomed.
Now, as their dead comrades march beside them across the bare fields (stanzas 8–10), the ‘Night March’ becomes a ‘Dead March’, with something of a ‘Danse Macabre’. ‘Festubert / And Loos and Ypres’ evoke battles of 1914 and 1915 in which the Royal Welch Fusiliers suffered terrible losses ; yet, as Graves wrote in Goodbye to All That, ‘The regimental spirit persistently survived all catastrophes’ (p. 78). For Graves himself, the names had personal resonances. He had endured the horrors of trench warfare from 25 September to 3 October 1915 in the Battle of Loos ; and it was near Festubert, in the Pas-de-Calais, in November 1915 that he first met Sassoon (see Good-bye to All That, pp. 125–146, 154–55). And ‘Down to the Somme’ has, of course, a grimly prophetic ring ; on the first day alone of the disastrous Battle of the Somme, 1 July 1916, there were 60,000 British casualties, a third of them passing though the ‘arch of death’.
By the fourth part (stanzas 11–15) the once-hopeful pace has slowed ; the march that began in song and laughter has become a painful, silent ordeal. The menacing moon, which ‘glares’ ‘unwinking’ like a predator, reappears from earlier poems, ‘I Hate the Moon’ (written after a moonlight patrol) and ‘The Cruel Moon’, and anticipates the more sinister manifestations of the White Goddess. The concluding lines in this part suggest how war experience is reducing what these young men were so recently being taught at school to meaningless fragments, just as the march itself is part of a greater, ‘answerless’ riddle : ‘Why are we marching ?’
Yet ‘We win’, reaffirmed three times, sets the tone of the fifth part (stanzas 16–19). The ‘left, right, left’ beat is ‘strong’ again. The men are at once ‘charmed together’ and ‘hounded on’ by it, and these ‘conflicting emotional ideas’ precisely convey the ambiguity of their situation : they are relentlessly urged like hunting dogs towards the kill ; and they are bound by the spell of comradeship (‘The men with stout hearts help the weak’). The line ‘We win the twenty-third by pride’ epitomises the poem. Pride in their regiment, pride in being a Fusilier, is the force that keeps them marching (as Graves had previously put it, ‘Lucasta, he’s a Fusilier, / And his pride keeps him here’ (‘To Lucasta on going to the Wars – for the Fourth Time’)). This stubborn pride is in the doing, in accomplishing the march, for actually each mile brings them closer to inevitable disaster. So the first light that ‘declares night nearly gone’ is doubly ‘false’, for another night and another march await them ; and when dawn does come it is ‘Red’, warning of bad weather – ‘down comes the rain’ – but also, like the flaring sunset, suggestive of blood. Nor do they march for the Christian values preached in patriotic sermons from England’s pulpits. The war seems to mock the Biblical texts enshrined in the familiar hymns of stanza 19. Both the titles are ironically apposite ; and ‘New Every Morning’ goes on to sing of ‘a road / To bring us, daily, nearer God’, while ‘Fight the good fight with all thy might / Christ is thy strength and Christ thy right’ concludes, ‘Life with its way before us lies, / Christ is the path and Christ the prize.’
The church spires in stanza 20 do at least signify that the end of the march is in sight. In this final part (stanzas 20–23) the poem’s rhythm ‘quickens’ with the step of the Fusiliers as, despite the ‘tears / Of weariness’ underlying that wry ‘most cheerily’, they put on the stirring show that pride demands and enter the town in triumph. But the usual army chores mean there is still no rest for them, and the poem closes sombrely with ‘the dark thought in every mind / ‘To-night they’ll march us on again.’
Graves seems to have based the poem at least partly on a march undertaken by his battalion in December 1915 when they were moved south to the Somme from Festubert, where they had been struggling to dig trenches in freezing conditions. Sassoon, who made the journey with him, describes it in Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man (pp. 251–253), as Graves notes in Goodbye to All That ; his own terse account of the actual march is as follows (p. 157) :

The march took us along pavé roads and rough chalk tracks of Picardy downland. It started about midnight and finished at six o’clock next morning, the men carrying their packs and rifles. There was a competition between the companies as to which would have the fewest stragglers ; ‘A’ [Graves’s company] won. The village we finally arrived at was named Montagne le Fayel [between Abbeville and Amiens].

In one of the drafts ‘Night March’ has the subtitle ‘an Allegory’, but Graves dropped it, wisely. The poem conveys its wider symbolic meaning all the more effectively by implying it instead of signalling it. Graves was critical of the propaganda element in Sassoon’s war poems. Only in the last line of ‘Night March’ does that single word ‘they’ make, obliquely, its point.


Works Cited

Graves, Robert, Goodbye to All That, revised edition (London : Cassell, 1957 (1929))

Complete Poems, Vols I–III, ed. Beryl Graves and Dunstan Ward (Manchester : Carcanet,
1995, 1997, 1999 ; Penguin Classics, 2003)

Complete Writings on Poetry, edited by Paul O’Prey (Manchester : Carcanet, 1995)

— ‘The Patchwork Flag’, typescript book, with ms. sheet of comments by Siegfried
Sassoon ; Berg Collection, New York Public Library

— Letter to Edward Marsh, 22 December 1917 ; Berg Collection, New York Public Library

Hibberd, Dominic, ‘ “The Patchwork Flag” (1918) : An Unrecorded Book by Robert Graves’,
Review of English Studies, new series, XLI, 164 (1990), pp. 521–32

Sassoon, Siegfried, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man (1928), in The Complete Memoirs of
George Sherston
(London : Faber, 1972 (1937))

</div

« Pourquoi cette marche ? »

« Marche de nuit », de Robert Graves

Après avoir écouté Robert Graves lire « Marche de nuit » en décembre 1917, son ami, lui-même poète, Siegfried Sassoon, en parle comme d’une « magnifique création – son effort le plus soutenu « (Lettre à Edward Marsh, 22 décembre 1917). Ce poème exprime en effet de façon émouvante l’amour que le poète ressentait pour son régiment d’infanterie gallois, le Royal Welch Fusiliers. Quand il se porta volontaire à l’âge de dix-neuf ans, une semaine après que l’Angleterre eut déclaré la guerre, il le choisit « quasiment à l’aveugle » (Goodbye to All That, p. 72), mais « apprit à l’honorer » (lettre à Marsh, 9 février 1916).
« Marche de nuit » venait d’être écrit quand Sassoon se rendit à Rhyl, au nord du Pays de Galles, le 21 décembre 1917, pour rendre visite à Graves, qui instruisait là de jeunes officiers. Il était rentré, venant de France, depuis dix mois, ayant été gravement blessé durant la Bataille de la Somme, le 20 juillet 1916 ; on annonça qu’il était mort le lendemain matin, son nom figurant dans la liste des soldats tués, dans le Times. Pourtant, de façon étonnante, il survécut, et six mois plus tard, à la suite de sa convalescence en Grande-Bretagne, il se trouvait de nouveau dans la Somme. Dans la glace et la boue des tranchées, sa santé se détériora bientôt et il finit à l’hôpital, à Oxford, son service actif désormais achevé.
A l’été 1918, Graves assembla un nouveau recueil, qui devait s’appeler « The Patchwork Flag » (« Le drapeau rapiécé »), dont l’un des quarante-trois poèmes était « Marche de nuit ». Sassoon, auquel il fit parvenir la tapuscrit, renouvela ses louanges, qualifiant ce poème de « belle création » tout en ajoutant qu’il n’était pas « apte à la critique de poèmes longs (étant partisan de la condensation et des effets de raccourci) » (feuille du tapuscrit de « Patchwork Flag », Berg). Il avait des doutes sur le livre en son entier, toutefois, tout comme leur mutuel ami Robert Ross. Graves décida donc de laisser tomber le projet. Par la suite, la plupart des poèmes apparurent dans des périodiques et des recueils, mais « Marche de nuit » resta non publié. Le tapuscrit de « The Patchwork Flag » demeura dans l’oubli au sein de la collection Berg à la Bibliothèque de New York jusqu’à ce que le critique et biographe Dominic Hibberd le découvre. Il adjoignit le texte de « Marche de nuit » à un article publié dans la Review of English Studies en 1990, rangeant « ce sévère hommage au courage du régiment » parmi ce que Graves « écrivit de plus impressionnant sur son expérience de guerre » (p. 527). En 1999, ce poème trouva finalement sa place avec le reste de sa poésie dans le Volume 3 de ses Complete Poems (Poésies complètes).
Dans « Marche de nuit », Graves utilise la forme traditionnelle de la ballade anglaise, en exploitant avec ingéniosité les caractéristiques techniques. Les vingt-trois quatrains correspondent, comme l’a montré Dominic Hibberd, aussi bien aux vingt-trois « miles » (un « mile » = un kilomètre 600) de la marche qu’au régiment lui-même (le « vingt-troisième régiment d’infanterie »). L’accomplissement de l’exploit se reflète donc dans « l’effort soutenu » de la composition (et de la lecture). La strophe de quatre vers correspond à la disposition des soldats, vivants et morts sur un même pied, qui « marchent / Par quatre » (Strophe 10, vers 1-2) tandis que les rimes croisées abab font contrepoint au « gauche droite gauche droite » de la cadence militaire. Celle-ci se révèle très clairement dans le rythme à quatre accents des vers, que Graves déploie avec une habileté remarquable pour en intensifier le sens, en introduisant constamment au sein du rythme iambique (« And shoulders laugh beneath their load » / « Et les épaules rient sous leur fardeau ») des variations, au moyen de trochées surtout (au début du vers notamment, comme dans le premier : « Evening » / « Le soir ») et des spondées (« Fall in ! » / « A vos rangs ! »). A cela s’ajoutent, pour renforcer l’effet, allitérations et assonances, dont Graves doit sa maîtrise de toute une vie à son étude précoce de la poésie traditionnelle galloise. L’accumulation, strophe après strophe, de ces résonances s’apparente à la transe et « cette heure de transe et de sommeil » (strophe 7, vers 2) suggère parfaitement cet état inspiré dans lequel Graves voyait l’effet du rythme sur le poète, ce que le poème à son tour crée chez son lecteur : « Le noyau de tout poème digne de ce nom prend forme rythmique dans l’esprit du poète au cours d’une suspension, semblable à la transe, de ses habitudes ordinaires de pensée, par la réconciliation, par-delà la logique, d’émotions en conflit » ; « il faut que le lecteur du poème tombe dans une transe équivalente afin d’en apprécier la pleine signification » (« Observations on Poetry 1922-1925) ; Collected Writings on Poetry, pp. 3-4. / Remarques sur la poésie 1922-1925 ; Essais complets sur la poésie).
A un rythme plus ample correspondent les groupes de six strophes équivalant aux différentes étapes de la marche, qui structurent le poème. L’introduction est paisible, quand « nous soldats » partagent le repos du soir, interrompu par « l’appel » à former les rangs. Dans une version du poème (dans la collection poétique, SUNY à Buffalo), on trouve des échanges verbaux entre « Un officier » (« le Capitaine » : « belle nuit pour voyager, les gars ! »), un « Caporal-chef » et un « Caporal ». Le thème de la camaraderie, et l’impact dramatique du poème, prennent de la vigueur dans la version définitive, car la marche y est dépeinte du point de vue des « gars ». (Le narrateur à la première personne qui maudit « le fardeau de [son] paquetage » à la strophe 11 est l’un d’eux, car les officiers (comme le Capitaine Graves) ne portaient ni paquetage ni fusil : se reporter à l’extrait de Goodbye to All That ci-dessous).
Les soldats se mettent en route d’une humeur enjouée, mais on trouve à la quatrième strophe de sombres sous-entendus : « Où nous rendons-nous, au pas cadencé ? Nul ne sait, / Pourquoi cette marche ? Qui s’en soucie ? » : l’apparente insouciance suggère, sur un autre plan, futilité, désarroi, irresponsabilité. Prennent-ils la route du « joyeux couchant » en plus d’un sens ? Le soleil « flambe » comme pour illuminer une cible…
Ces allusions se confirment dans ce qui suit (strophes 5-7), alors que les soldats suivent au pas cadencé une route humide entre les arbres. Le crépuscule fait des sons et des formes de sinistres présages. Dans leur état « de transe et de sommeil », les marcheurs subissent l’embuscade des forces irrationnelles de l’inconscient qui trouvent leur expression dans le mythe, le conte ou le folklore. Les « vieux démons de la nuit » s’apparentent aux « anciens dieux » de « Hors-la-loi », autre poème de « The Patchwok Flag », qui « dans les bois humides, […] se dissimulent, / Avides d’humanité ». Le gémissement d’une « banshee » (être surnaturel gaélique de l’époque pré-chrétienne ; sorte de fée), croyait-on, annonçait la mort. Les soldats se rendant compte qu’ils vont « direct à la Somme », sont déjà condamnés.
Or, comme les camarades défunts traversent à leurs côtés les champs nus (strophes 8-10), la « Marche de nuit » devient une « marche de la mort », avec une suggestion de « Danse macabre ». Festubert, Loos et Ypres évoquent des batailles les batailles de 1914 et 1915 au cours desquelles le Royal Welch Fusilier subit de terribles pertes ; toutefois, comme Graves l’écrivit dans Goodbye to All That : « L’esprit du régiment s’obstinait à survivre à toutes les catastrophes. » (p. 78) Pour Graves lui-même, ces noms avaient des résonances personnelles. Il avait en effet souffert l’horreur de la guerre des tranchées du 25 septembre au 3 octobre 1915 à la bataille de Loos et ce fut près de Festubert, dans le Pas-de-Calais, en novembre 1915, qu’il rencontra pour la première fois Sassoon (voir Goodbye to All That, pp. 125-146, 154-55). Et « Direct à la Somme » résonne, bien entendu, d’une note sinistrement prophétique puisque, rien que le premier jour de la désastreuse bataille, le 1er juillet 1916, 60 000 soldats britanniques tombèrent, dont un tiers passa sous « la voûte de la mort ».
Quand débute la quatrième partie (strophes 11-15), la cadence, jadis optimiste, a ralenti ; la marche qui avait commencé dans les chants et les rires s’est muée en douloureuse épreuve silencieuse. La lune menaçante, qui luit « sans sourciller », telle une prédatrice, résurgence de poèmes antérieurs, « Je déteste la lune » (écrit après une patrouille au clair de lune) et « La lune cruelle », annonce les manifestations plus sinistres de la Déesse blanche. Les vers qui concluent cette partie suggèrent combien l’expérience de guerre réduit ce que les jeunes gens ont appris récemment à l’école à des fragments sans signification, tout comme la marche elle-même fait partie d’une plus vaste énigme sans réponse : « Pourquoi cette marche ? »
Cependant, « nous gagnons », trois fois affirmé, donne le ton de la cinquième partie (strophes 16-19). La pulsation « gauche droite gauche droite » a repris de la vigueur. Les hommes en sont « liés par enchantement » et « projetés en avant comme une meute », et ces « émotions en conflit » expriment précisément l’ambiguïté de leur situation. On les précipite impitoyablement comme une meute sur la proie, liés qu’ils sont par le sortilège de la camaraderie (« Les hommes au cœur vigoureux assistent les faibles »). Ce vers : « Nous gagnons le quarantième kilomètre par orgueil » résume le poème. L’orgueil d’appartenir à ce régiment, d’être un Fusilier, est la force qui les meut (comme Graves l’avait dit auparavant : « Lucasta, c’est un Fusilier / Et il est rivé là par orgueil » (« A Lucasta en allant à la guerre – pour la quatrième fois »). Cet orgueil opiniâtre tient à l’acte, à l’accomplissement de la marche, car chaque kilomètre les rapproche réellement de l’inévitable désastre. Ainsi la première lueur qui « déclare la nuit presque achevée » est doublement « simulacre », car une autre nuit et une autre marche les attendent. Quand l’aurore vient vraiment, elle est « rouge », annonçant du mauvais temps – « la pluie commence à tomber » –, mais, comme le coucher flambant de soleil, évoquant le sang. Les soldats ne marchent pas non plus pour les valeurs chrétiennes prêchées en chaire en Angleterre dans les sermons patriotiques. La guerre paraît faire fi du texte biblique enchâssé dans les cantiques familiers de la strophe 19. Les deux titres sont d’une ironique justesse. « De nouveau chaque matin » parle d’une route qui nous mène chaque jour plus près de Dieu, tandis que « Bats-toi comme il faut de toutes tes forces / Le Christ est ta vigueur et ton droit » s’achève ainsi : « Nous avons devant nous le chemin de la vie / Le Christ en est la voie et la récompense ».
Les clochers d’église à la strophe 20 signifient vraiment au moins que la fin de la marche est en vue. Dans cette dernière partie (strophes 20-23), le rythme du poème « s’accélère » en même temps que le pas des soldats tandis que, en dépit des « larmes / De lassitude » qui sous-tendent cet ironique « très allégrement », ils adoptent l’allure enthousiaste que réclame l’orgueil et entrent dans la ville en triomphe. Mais les corvées militaires usuelles signifient qu’il n’y a toujours pas de repos pour eux et le poème s’achève de façon pessimiste avec : « cette sombre pensée de trotter en l’esprit de chacun : / « Ce soir, ils vont à nouveau nous mener au pas cadencé. »
Il semble que Graves ait fondé ce poème au moins en partie sur une marche entreprise par ses hommes en décembre 1915 quand on déplaça son bataillon jusqu’à la Somme, vers le Sud, de Festubert, où ils s’étaient échinés à creuser des tranchées alors qu’il gelait. Sassoon, qui fit le voyage avec lui, le décrit dans Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man (pp. 251-253 ; Mémoires d’un chasseur de renards), comme le note Graves dans Goodbye to All That. Voici son propre compte rendu, laconique, de la marche réelle (p. 157) :
« Durant cette marche, nous parcourûmes routes pavées et rudes sentiers crayeux des collines de Picardie. Elle débuta vers minuit et s’acheva à six heures le lendemain matin, les hommes portant paquetage et fusil. Les compagnies rivalisaient à qui aurait le moins de traînards ; la gagnante fut la compagnie A [celle de Graves]. Le village que nous atteignîmes enfin s’appelait Montagne le Fayel [entre Abbeville et Amiens]. »
Dans l’une des versions, « Marche de nuit » s’accompagne du sous-titre : « Allégorie », que Graves abandonna toutefois, sagement. Le poème exprime sa teneur symbolique plus vaste d’autant plus efficacement qu’elle est suggérée plutôt que signalée. Graves n’approuvait pas l’élément de propagande dans les poèmes de guerre de Sassoon. Il n’y a que dans le dernier vers de « Marche de nuit » que ce seul mot : « Ils » fait allusion à cette question.

Traduction A.M.

Ouvrages cités :

Graves, Robert, Goodbye to All That, revised edition (London : Cassell, 1957 (1929))

Complete Poems, Vols I–III, ed. Beryl Graves and Dunstan Ward (Manchester : Carcanet,
1995, 1997, 1999 ; Penguin Classics, 2003)

Complete Writings on Poetry, edited by Paul O’Prey (Manchester : Carcanet, 1995)

— ‘The Patchwork Flag’, typescript book, with ms. sheet of comments by Siegfried
Sassoon ; Berg Collection, New York Public Library

— Letter to Edward Marsh, 22 December 1917 ; Berg Collection, New York Public Library

Hibberd, Dominic, ‘ “The Patchwork Flag” (1918) : An Unrecorded Book by Robert Graves’,
Review of English Studies, new series, XLI, 164 (1990), pp. 521–32

Sassoon, Siegfried, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man (1928), in The Complete Memoirs of
George Sherston
(London : Faber, 1972 (1937))

La version française des poèmes de Graves est disponible dans : Robert Graves, Poèmes. Introduction et traduction par Anne Mounic. Paris : L’Harmattan, 2000.